Building A Financial Stock Scanner With Ruby On Rails and R. Part 20. On the Home[Page] Run.

This is a 20th Jubilee post. And we are on the home run. There is one last major feature that is left to be implemented – a home page that will display few of the Australian stockmarket financial indices, namely – All Ordinaries (AORD), Small Ordinaries (AXSO) and the Industry sector indices listed here. This will provide ‘at a glance’ view of the ASX/Sectors performance. For the charts I will use the same GMMAs as for the companies.

Continue reading “Building A Financial Stock Scanner With Ruby On Rails and R. Part 20. On the Home[Page] Run.”

Building A Financial Stock Scanner With Ruby On Rails and R. Part 20. On the Home[Page] Run.

Building Financial Stock Scanner with Ruby on Rails and R. Part 16. “I see only forms that are lit up and forms that are not”. (Francisco de Goya)

Let’s update our web site with an ability to add/edit/delete lists of stock tickers.

Continue reading “Building Financial Stock Scanner with Ruby on Rails and R. Part 16. “I see only forms that are lit up and forms that are not”. (Francisco de Goya)”

Building Financial Stock Scanner with Ruby on Rails and R. Part 16. “I see only forms that are lit up and forms that are not”. (Francisco de Goya)

Building Financial Stock Scanner with Ruby on Rails and R. Part 15. Putting [a graphical inter]face to a name.

Past 14 posts all dealt with the command line. Am I bored you with all that CLI interactions? Let’s bring some colour and shapes and the actual diagrams into the life of our application. So let’s start writing a web user interface! Continue reading “Building Financial Stock Scanner with Ruby on Rails and R. Part 15. Putting [a graphical inter]face to a name.”

Building Financial Stock Scanner with Ruby on Rails and R. Part 15. Putting [a graphical inter]face to a name.

Building Financial Stock Scanner with Ruby on Rails and R. Part 13. Parallel Processing. “We are one, but we are many…”

In this post we explore an option for asynchronous / parallel execution of the R/Quantmod/Ruby charts generation batch job. The quote in the title, is, actually from a song (used in this ad for an Australian telecom company Telstra). Taken out of the context it can represent a ‘fork()’ call, and, thus, somewhat related to the subject.
Continue reading “Building Financial Stock Scanner with Ruby on Rails and R. Part 13. Parallel Processing. “We are one, but we are many…””

Building Financial Stock Scanner with Ruby on Rails and R. Part 13. Parallel Processing. “We are one, but we are many…”

Building Financial Stock Scanner with Ruby on Rails and R. Part 12. Need4Speed.

In this post we will continue our quest to improve performance of the charts generation batch job. We will take the further clues provided by the TRIZ analysis in the previous post, implement some of them and measure the end result against the original, baseline, performance results.
Continue reading “Building Financial Stock Scanner with Ruby on Rails and R. Part 12. Need4Speed.”

Building Financial Stock Scanner with Ruby on Rails and R. Part 12. Need4Speed.

Building Financial Stock Scanner with Ruby on Rails and R. Part 9. Feeding Mongo data into Quantmod.

So far we learned how to get historical ASX price data into MongoDB and how to draw charts with R/Quantmod. Now it is time to integrate.

Continue reading “Building Financial Stock Scanner with Ruby on Rails and R. Part 9. Feeding Mongo data into Quantmod.”

Building Financial Stock Scanner with Ruby on Rails and R. Part 9. Feeding Mongo data into Quantmod.